Earthquake Building Damage Assessment using UAV

A team from Department of Civil and Geomatics Engineering, went out to the Kuttal village of Dhulikel municipality, and Panga and Itagol of Kirtipur municipality to collect the data about the damage caused due to devastating earthquake on April 25th, 2015. The team used emerging technology of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, which the Geospatial Lab has been using for the Biomass Estimation Research Project here at Kathmandu University. The team collected the aerial images of these places with the Sony Digital Camera mounted on the UAV. The team deployed self-assembled hexacopter as a sensor carrier for serving the purpose.

A Sample image taken from UAV

A Sample image taken from UAV

The UAV flights were conducted in the first week of May, 2015. The team collected aerial images of these places using the digital camera mounted on the hexacopter. The camera mounted on the UAV was Sony Cybershot W120. The images were taken at the height of about 100m from the ground. The image overlap were 80%  in the flight direction and 60% across the flight direction. The UAV has its inbuilt GPS and IMU so the location of camera position was recorded for each image along the flight.

Preliminary Damage Assessment Map of Kuttal Village with mosaicked image

Preliminary Damage Assessment Map of Kuttal Village with mosaicked image

: Preliminary Damage Assessment Map of Panga, Kirtipur

: Preliminary Damage Assessment Map of Panga, Kirtipur

Preliminary Damage Assessment Map of Kuttal Village

Preliminary Damage Assessment Map of Kuttal Village

pree

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One thought on “Earthquake Building Damage Assessment using UAV

  1. Really neat website you guys have!

    Some questions regarding the UAV
    1. Was it the KUCopter that you used for terrain mapping? If not was it an open hardware, OTS component assembly you did or did you have a commercial UAV. Custom assembled UAVs, as far as I know, can be a real pain in the ass because you have to keep maintaining that stuff over and over again. At least, that’s what I have seen.

    2. Did you have any telemetry on board to send data real time (you mentioned GPS, IMU or even the payload imagery) or did you just store it on board and then later retrieved it .
    3. Did you guys have an autopilot or did you actually manually drive that thing up to 100m, because you know they might just fall off the sky.

    Couple of questions regarding logistics/random stuff
    1. Charging the LiPo batteries? in rural areas? how did you manage to do so
    2. Repairs? did you guys have any issues with repairing, component loss or even crashes?
    3. How heavy is it btw?

    I have some further questions regarding some of the terrain challenges you faced:
    1. Was the quad optimized for such terrain? what features do you think would better to have on such a multirotor.
    2. Have you explored other sensors for terrain mapping?
    3. Would low resolution 3D mapping be better than just a 2D on such terrains? Because 2D seems to be doing just fine as well.

    feel free to take your time and answer them. I have a few friends here who might be interested in the work you are doing and might link you up with them. The issue is that staying here and trying to come up with a system design for Nepali terrain won’t do any good, so we need feedback from people who have actually gone to the ground and worked their ass off to get the data like the one above.

    Please do include your email as well, I will be in touch
    Regards,
    abhas

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